The grape harvest for Amarone production is laid out in the drying room to fully dehydrateThe grape harvest for Amarone production is laid out in the drying room to fully dehydrate

All about Amarone



A silky smooth wine

Amarone comes from Valpolicella in the northern Italian region of Veneto – but it doesn’t taste like a northerner! It caresses the palate with a silky smooth touch, glimmers with vitality and concentration, exhibiting Baroque richness and sumptuous fruit. You’ll fall head over heels, and not just because of the 17 per cent alcohol content …



Traditionally dried

Amarone – a sweet wine? Ma no! Traditionally, it has always been a dry wine. The impression of sweetness comes from the glycerine produced by the dried grapes during fermentation. The trend towards really sweet Amarone only came about in the last 15 years. But there’s still a limit:

15 grams of residual sugar is the maximum amount per litre.



Ah, appassimento!

The secret to Amarone is appassimento. This is the name of the drying process that comes before fermentation. The grapes are laid out on wooden racks in well-ventilated rooms to rest for two to four months, during which they lose up to 50 per cent of their weight. The result is small, shrivelled aroma bombs.




Grape Renaissance

Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara are the big three when it comes to Amarone grapes. But for the past few years, long-forgotten varieties like Oseleta and Corvinone have been getting in on the act again. Leading producer Masi in particular has really contributed to their rebirth.



Game on!

Amarone and game, now there’s a perfect match. Not to mention mature Parmigiano or Gorgonzola, pasta with hare or boar ragù, veal cheek, oxtail or, as a real treat, wagyu beef – all of which count themselves lucky to be paired with such a fine drop.


Breathe deeply

Such a big personality needs its space. Before enjoying, decant Amarone in a carafe with plenty of room to breathe and serve it in large glasses. This will allow it to fully reveal its bouquet.


Let it age

You can easily put it in the cellar and forget about it for 15 years. During this time, it will swap out its fresh cherry aroma for a complex bouquet of rum-soaked fruit, leather, coffee beans, cigars and dried mushrooms.


Cool, baby

No more than 18 degrees – that’s the ideal serving temperature for Amarone. Forget about room temperature! Any more than 20 degrees, and the aromas dissipate. That would be a shame indeed …



Our range of Amarone


  1. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2019
    75 cl
    Costasera – Amarone della Valpolicella classico docg, Masi
    CHF41.00
  2. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2018
    75 cl
    Amarone della Valpolicella classico docg, Ca’ La Bionda
    CHF45.00
  3. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2015
    75 cl
    Mazzano – Amarone della Valpolicella classico doc, Masi
    CHF150.00 netto n
  4. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2016
    65 % Corvina, 20 % Rondinella, 15 % Molinara

    75 cl
    Vaio Armaron – Amarone della Valpolicella classico docg, Serego Alighieri
    CHF72.00
  5. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2017
    70 % Corvina, 20 % Corvinone, 10 % Rondinella, Molinara

    75 cl
    Ravazzol – Amarone della Valpolicella classico docg, Ca’ La Bionda
    CHF56.00
  6. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2017
    Rondinella, Molinara, Corvina, Oseleta

    75 cl
    Riserva di Costasera – Amarone della Valpolicella classico docg, Riserva, Masi
    CHF54.00
  7. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2013
    70 % Corvina, 25 % Rondinella, 5 % Molinara

    75 cl
    Campolongo di Torbe – Amarone della Valpolicella classico doc, Masi
    CHF145.00 netto n
  8. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2018
    70 % Corvina, 25 % Rondinella, 5 % Molinara

    75 cl
    Costasera – Amarone della Valpolicella classico docg, Masi
    CHF41.00
  9. - +
    Italy, Veneto
    2015
    65 % Corvina, 20 % Rondinella, 15 % Molinara

    75 cl
    Vaio Armaron – Amarone della Valpolicella classico docg, Serego Alighieri
    CHF72.00
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